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The Bare Escentuals Brushless Mascara

I am intrigued by the brush-less-ness of this mascara from Bare Escentuals. I know that many mascara-users are devoted to their Diorshow, but I don't even want to think about getting close to such an enormous brush head! I can already imagine myself throwing a fit, because I have just poked myself in the eye with smudged mascara everywhere!

Bare Escentuals promises to give long falsies with this mascara. To put this on, we are supposed to 'blink into' the wand, rather than using the conventional method of wiggle and stroke. From experience of having used numerous mascaras, a lengthening mascara must have certain characteristics. The first and most important is the mascara's formula. The formula must be slightly stickier (if you can imagine that) than regular formulas and, it must contain fibers. A slightly sticky formula allows you to smoothly attach the fibers to your lashes. It also gives the time needed to really lengthen the lashes, and to shape and sculpt them. Be careful of the mascaras who's formula is very wet though, because the attached fibers may not dry fast enough and will have a tendency to go 'wonky'. The second important feature is the brush head itself. Skinnier brush heads tend to be better at lengthening than larger ones.

So it seems that this mascara from Bare Escentuals may work. I'm not really in the market for a new mascara because I am still devoted to my Imju Fiberwig Mascara. However, if someone has tried this and/or thinks that there is a great mascara out there for lashes with the 3 's' (short, straight & sparse), please do share with us!








Credits: Grayburn, bareescentuals.com

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7 Comments:

Anonymous said...

I've tried this and it doesn't work. My fav mascaras are all from lancome.

The Seeker said...

Oh dear, I think I could manage that...
Sometimes I've my problems with the tradicional brush...
But you give great information about what's the best mascara's formula. I'll pay attention to that.

xoxo

The Seeker said...

sorry ...couldn't manage that...

Kate Monoi said...

Maybe this could work. It is drawing my attention. It is true what the seeker said, you give good information on mascaras!

Vanessa said...

Wow that looks so interesting!

Anonymous said...

There's nothing new about this product. In fact, it's very old. I collect old magazines, and I have several from the early 1960s which have ads for the first wand-type "automatic" (as they were called then) mascara, which was created by Maybelline. The ads show the wand, and it looks just like this one: with grooves instead of a brush.

At that time, full, thick, doe-eyed lashes were the fashion, and the previous "cake" mascaras were okay at creating them, but the new "automatic" mascara did it better. To apply cake mascara, you had to wet the cake, which meant the product went on very wet. So women trying the new "automatic" mascara would have been used to a very wet mascara, and would have expected to have to wait for it to dry.

But mascara has come a long way since then, so we're used to a stickier, fast-drying product that goes on with a brush and doesn't clump. If you want to try an authentic vintage method of applying mascara, this product gives it to you. And it can be fun to try authentic vintage ways of doing things, to get a better appreciation of how far we've come since then. I sometimes write letters using an antique "dip" pen and an inkwell. But while it's fun to try, it's just way too time-consuming and messy to take the place of today's more convenient methods. This mascara is the "dip-pen-and-inkwell" method of doing your lashes.

Grayburn said...

Hi Anonymous...I love older methods of applying makeup; especially using the lip papers that press color onto lips. I really appreciate your insight about this mascara and it is really interesting that it is based on an older method of darkening lashes. In fact, your comment has inspired me to look into and write more about it in a future post.

I actually miss using antique pens and have enjoyed it in the past. The fact that it is so time-consuming is what makes it so special and de-stressing (for me anyways!).

Thanks again for your comment and I look forward to hearing from you again.

x Grayburn